Department for Education LMI workshop

Earlier this year, sixteen experts in the field of careers and developers of digital careers tools attended a labour market information (LMI) workshop, hosted by the Department for Education (DfE).

The aims of the workshop were to:

  • Inform and update delegates about the LMI for All service.
  • Provide a forum for careers experts and developers to share their views and experience.
  • Encourage the development of user-friendly careers tools, which can be used in a tailored way with people who are less confident using digital tools.
  • Explore how the LMI for All service and DfE could better support the needs of current and prospective developers.
Photograph of LMI workshop

The workshop started with Sally-Anne Barnes and Jenny Bimrose from the Institute for Employment Research (IER) at the University of Warwick giving a presentation about the LMI for All service. They explained the role of LMI in careers education and guidance before providing an overview of LMI for All. For all delegates, this was an opportunity to find out about the datasets which are used and upcoming activities. After a question and answer session, delegates discussed how they currently use LMI and how they could start or continue to use LMI for All.

After lunch, Rebecca Towner, Medway Youth Trust spoke passionately about the careers information that students are accessing, the issues they face and what changes can be made to meet their needs. From further discussions after the talk, the group agreed that careers tools should provide real life examples and context, whilst having a clear audience and encourage exploration. The group also agreed developers should be aware of avoiding confusing language and of creating online only resources, as this may limit who can use the tools.

Delegates provided useful feedback about how LMI for All and DfE can better support them to develop and use high-quality careers information tools. The feedback given at the workshop has been used to inform the re-design of the new LMI for All website to make it as accessible and user-friendly as possible and improve IER’s stakeholder engagement.

Photograph of Amy Hams

Blog post written by Amy Hams from the Careers Policy Unit, Department for Education

Skills for Green Jobs


Addressing climate change and setting economies and societies more firmly onto a path towards a sustainable, low-carbon future is one of the defining challenges of our time. Such shift will entail far-reaching transformations of our economies, changing the ways we consume and produce, shifting energy sources, and leveraging new technologies.

The European Centre for Vocational Education and Training, Cedefop, has released a new report on Skills for Green Jobs. The report is based on country studies undertaken in collaboration with the International Labour Organization (ILO) in six countries (Denmark, Germany, Estonia, Spain, France and the UK) since 2010.

A key outcome, says CEDEFOP, is that countries vary in their approach to defining, classifying and collecting data on green jobs and skills. However, they have observed increased efforts are observed on data collection on developments in the ‘green economy’.

Since 2010, green employment trends have tended to parallel general economic trends. Carbon reduction targets and associated incentives and subsidies have been especially influential on green jobs and skills; other green policies, such as legislation to protect the environment, have also been important.

Although few countries have a strategy on skills for green jobs, “the updating of qualifications and VET programmes has soared, reflecting increased demand for green jobs and skills since 2010.” Updates mainly concern adding ‘green’ components to existing qualifications/programmes, since changes in skill demands are perceived more pertinent to including new green skills within existing occupations rather than the creation of new green ones.

 

More information is available in the CEDEFOP magazine promoting learning for work, Skillset and Match.

Influences of the changing nature, and integration of LMI into career practice

Photo of Jenny Bimrose at NICEC conference 2019

Jenny Bimrose presented at the NICEC international conference (Changing boundaries: career, identity, and self. An international conference on research, practice and policy in career development) on 16 April, 2019 on LMI for All. The presentation examined the integration of labour market information (LMI) with information communications technology (ICT) as a case study of the changing professional identity of career practitioners. It focused on the way that career practitioners, like their clients, operate in increasingly volatile and pressurised work environments, with many now required to work differently in ways that require shifts, sometimes dramatic, in their professional or occupational identity, for example, the integration of labour market information (LMI) through the use of technology, into their core practice. Like their clients, they have to construct their own meaning of work to survive and thrive, with proactivity and adaptivity crucial for navigating their own increasingly complex and challenging pathways. Developments in thinking about identity development at work (Brown & Bimrose, 2015; 2018) led to the idea that learning at work can be effectively supported if it is understood that such learning can be represented as a process of identity development. Drawing on two major IER research studies (LMI for All and EmployID), this workshop focused on the influences of the changing nature, and integration of LMI into career practice through the use of ICT, on the professional identity transformation of career practitioners.

A poster relating to the development of LMI for All was displayed throughout the conference.

References

Brown A., & Bimrose J. (2018). Learning and Identity Development at Work. In: Milana M., Webb S., Holford J., Waller R., Jarvis P. (eds) The Palgrave International Handbook on Adult and Lifelong Education and Learning. Palgrave Macmillan, London.

Brown, A., & Bimrose, J. (2015). Identity development. In P.J.Hartung, M.L.Savickas, & W.B.Walsh (Eds.) APA handbook of career intervention, Volume 2: Applications (pp. 241-254). Washington, DC: APA.

Making sense and meanings from Labour Market Data

The increasing power of processors and the advent of Open Data provides us information in many areas of society including about the Labour Market. Labour Market data has many uses, including for research in understandings society, for economic and social planning and for helping young people and older people in planning and managing their occupation and career.

Yet data on its own is not enough. We have to make sense and meanings from the data and that is often not simple. Gender pay gap figures released by the UK Office of National Statistics last week reveal widespread inequality across British businesses as every industry continues to pay men more on average than women. This video by Guardian newspaper journalist Leah Green looks at the figures and busts some of the common myths surrounding the gender pay gap.

Find out about jobs and automation from the ONS chatbot

According to the Office for National Statistics, around 1.5 million jobs in England are at high risk of some of their duties and tasks being automated in the future.

The ONS analysed the jobs of 20 million people in England in 2017, and has found that 7.4% are at high risk of automation.

Automation involves replacing tasks currently done by workers with technology, which could include computer programs, algorithms, or even robots.

Women, young people, and those who work part-time are most likely to work in roles that are at high risk of automation.

It is important to understand automation as it may have an impact on the labour market, economy and society and on the skills and qualifications young people will need in the future.

The ONS have developed a chatbot for people to find out more about automation. You can try it out below and you can download the data here.